COVID-19 VACCINES

COVID-19 Vaccine Update:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends everyone aged 5 years and older should get a COVID-19 vaccination to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters:

COVID-19 Vaccine booster shots are available for individuals who are 18 and older and completed their initial Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna series at least 6 months ago or their initial dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen at least 2 months ago.

COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots

Who is eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot?

Currently, COVID-19 vaccine booster shots are available for the following Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccine recipients who completed their initial series at least 6 months ago and are 18 years or older.

COVID-19 vaccine boosters are also available for Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine recipients who completed their initial dose at least 2 months ago and are 18 years or older. 

When can I get a COVID-19 vaccine booster if I am NOT in one of the recommended groups?

Additional populations may be recommended to receive a booster shot as more data become available. The COVID-19 vaccines approved and authorized in the United States continue to be effective at reducing risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death. Experts are looking at all available data to understand how well the vaccines are working for different populations. This includes looking at how new variants, like Delta, affect vaccine effectiveness.

If we need a booster shot, are the vaccines working?

Yes. COVID-19 vaccines are working well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. However, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection, especially among certain populations, against mild and moderate disease. 

What are the risks to getting a booster shot?

So far, reactions reported after getting a booster shot were similar to those of the two-shot or single-dose primary series. You can use v-safe to tell CDC about any side effects. If you enter your booster shot in your v-safe account, the system will send you daily health check-ins. Fever, headache, fatigue and pain at the injection site were the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most side effects were mild to moderate. However, as with the two-shot or single-dose primary series, serious side effects are rare, but may occur. 

 

Am I still considered “fully vaccinated” if I don’t get a booster shot?

Yes. Everyone is still considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a two-shot series, such as the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as the J&J/Janssen vaccine.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 
 

Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccinations

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?

Yes, COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. COVID-19 vaccines were evaluated in tens of thousands of participants in clinical trials. The vaccines met the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) rigorous scientific standards for safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality needed to support approval or authorization of a vaccine.

Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines since they were authorized for emergency use by FDA. These vaccines have undergone and will continue to undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

Is it safe for my child to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes. Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Like adults, children may have some side effects after COVID-19 vaccination. These side effects may affect their ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Children 5 years and older are now eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines have been used under the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. Your child cannot get COVID-19 from any COVID-19 vaccine.

Why should my child get vaccinated against COVID-19?

COVID-19 vaccination can help protect your child from getting COVID-19. Although fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults, children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, can get sick from COVID-19, and can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 to others. Getting your child vaccinated helps to protect your child and your family. Vaccination is now recommended for everyone 5 years and older. Currently, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine is the only one available to children 5 years and older.

If I am pregnant, can I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes, COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people 5 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future. You might want to have a conversation with your healthcare provider about COVID-19 vaccination. While such a conversation might be helpful, it is not required before vaccination. Learn more about vaccination considerations for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you are pregnant and have received a COVID-19 vaccine, we encourage you to enroll in v-safe, CDC’s smartphone-based tool that provides personalized health check-ins after vaccination. A v-safe pregnancy registry has been established to gather information on the health of pregnant people who have received a COVID-19 vaccine.

If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 because:

  • Research has not yet shown how long you are protected from getting COVID-19 again after you recover from COVID-19.

  • Vaccination helps protect you even if you’ve already had COVID-19.

 

Evidence is emerging that people get better protection by being fully vaccinated compared with having had COVID-19. One study showed that unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than 2 times as likely than fully vaccinated people to get COVID-19 again.

 

If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Can I get vaccinated against COVID-19 while I am currently sick with COVID-19?

No. People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation; those without symptoms should also wait until they meet the criteria before getting vaccinated. This guidance also applies to people who get COVID-19 before getting their second dose of vaccine.

What are the possible side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?

You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Some people have no side effects.

Common side effects include:

On the arm where you got the shot

  • Pain

  • Redness

  • Swelling

Throughout the rest of your body:

  • Tiredness

  • Headache

  • Muscle pain

  • Chills

  • Fever

  • Nausea

Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccine monitoring has historically shown that side effects generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose. For this reason, the FDA required each of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines to be studied for at least two months (eight weeks) after the final dose.

What are the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines?

Vaccine ingredients can vary by manufacturer. To learn more about the ingredients in authorized COVID-19 vaccines, see

COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheets

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

COVID-19 Myths & Facts

Myth:

It's unsafe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day.

Fact: 

COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for everyone 5 years of age or older, including people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners.

Currently no evidence shows that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems (problems trying to get pregnant) in women or men. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and people who would like to have a baby.

 

Myth:

COVID-19 vaccines contain microchips. 

Fact: 

COVID-19 vaccines do not contain microchips. Vaccines are developed to fight against disease and are not administered to track your movement. Vaccines work by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies, exactly like it would if you were exposed to the disease. After getting vaccinated, you develop immunity to that disease, without having to get the disease first.

Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

Learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Myth:

Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will alter my DNA.

Fact: 

COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

Myth:

Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can cause me to test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test.

Fact:

None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​

If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

Learn more about the possibility of COVID-19 illness after vaccination.

Ready to get your COVID-19 vaccine or booster?

MVHC is administering COVID-19 vaccinations for individuals age 5 and older and boosters for individuals ages 18 and older by appointment Monday through Friday from 8am to 3pm at our Cambridge, Coshocton, Malta, South Zanesville, and Zanesville locations*. Individuals ages 5 through 17 must have a parent or legal guardian present at time of vaccine administration.

*This does not include MVHC Urgent Care locations.

 

To schedule an appointment, call 888-454-5157 or text 740-891-9000.

To find the closest MVHC location to you, click here.  

Coming in for your COVID-19 vaccine? Click here to print and fill out our Vaccination Consent Form before you come in to save time.

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Still have questions or concerns? Speak with one of our trusted MVHC Providers or click the links below for more information.

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